May 2011 College Readiness Tips for Teachers


Now more than ever, we need to help counselors and schools prepare our students for college. Join our group of lay-college counselors, aka high school teachers, with these 12 May 2011 tips. Use TAs and seniors to help you. I can send you a word version of this document, if needed.

  1. Develop a college readiness area in your classroom.
  • Post deadlines for testing, summer programs, and major scholarships.

Friday, May 6 is the deadline to sign up for June 11th ACT

Tuesday, May 10 is the deadline to sign up for June 4th SAT and SAT Subject Tests

Saturday, May 7 is the current test day for the SAT. Kids can try to walk in if they must.

  • Put up A-G requirements and tips for advancing and for making up failed or missed classes
  • Post posters of major tests. You can contact the College Board http://www.collegeboard.org/ for SAT deadlines and the ACT for ACT deadlines http://act.org.
  • Post pictures of former students at their colleges.
  • List names of the colleges your former students have attended.
  • Feature different colleges each week or month.

2.  Ask current college students who are just now returning for the summer to speak at your school.

  • With seniors-they can talk about getting ready to start college.
  • With juniors-they can talk about getting ready to apply and find financial aid and scholarships.
  • With young kids-they can talk about being serious in school and getting active in their communities and activities.
  • With parents and teachers-they can talk about why college is awesome and provide some useful                 tips for surviving and thriving in college.

3.  Put up a college board of your own college years. Post pictures, a copy of your diploma, and some memorabilia.   Contact your college to send you free stuff.

4.   Begin to collect books about college readiness. Start with

• The Fiske Guide         •  College Finder  •College Board’s Book of Majors

• CSO’s College Access and Opportunity Guide [1]

5.  Make college awareness and readiness websites as favorites on your classroom computers. Some great ones to start with…The College Board. ACT. Unigo. Cappex, Center for Student Opportunity, CSU Mentor, Hispanic College Fund, Latinos in College, and my site: Get Me To College

6.  Collect lists of colleges that offer fly-in programs for under-represented students and provide some kind of major aid to undocumented students. I have these lists if you want them.

7.  Participate in online workshops with your students. College Week Live has ongoing free workshops, online college fairs, and so much more. http://www.collegeweeklive.com/

8.  Sign up for college information tips.

  • The UCs have a counselor newsletter you can receive.
  • Unigo sends out expert advice daily.

9.  Use FB. If you have a teacher FB page, like as many college readiness sites as possible. My college name is getmetocollege freeadvice. CSO, Hispanic College Fund, Latinos in College, California Dream ACT, Undocumented Students, AB 540, and hundreds of colleges have pages.  Have your students friend me as well.

10. Develop college readiness links into your lessons. For example, use California Reality Check to help students see links between occupations, income, and college. http://www.californiarealitycheck.com/start.htm

11. Help seniors planning to go to community college get ready. It’s the toughest year yet to go to community college. For example, help them understand how to afford textbooks or find programs to help them transfer. http://www.cccp.ucla.edu/docs/CCCP%20Scholars%202011%2012.pdf is a great program for kids interesting in transferring to UCLA.

12. Contact Dr. Joseph to see if she can offer free workshops or connect you with folks who can.

[1] (lists colleges that offer major support to first gen kids and even comes with lesson plans how to use the book.

http://www.csopportunity.org/whatwedo/guidebook.aspx

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About rjoseph

I am the creator and visionary behind this site. I want to do everything I can to help students consider college as an option, even when they may be the first in their family to go or may not have the funds at hand. Don't let anyone tell you that you don't have the right or the ability to go to college.

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